Total Joint Arthroplasty Outcomes and the Potential Role of Rehabilitation

Overview:

The aim of this research project is to find out how much, and what type of rehabilitation people in New Zealand get before and after their Joint replacement, and see if that changes outcomes.

BAIL Researcher:

Dr Deborah Snell, PhD
Contact Details:
Burwood Academy of Independent Living (BAIL) Burwood Hospital Christchurch New Zealand
Phone 03 3836871
email: Debbie.Snell@burwood.org.nz

Other researchers and collaborators:

Ms Anne Sinnott, Burwood Academy of Independent Living (BAIL)
Professor Gary Hooper, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch
Dr Jen Dunn, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch
Professor Gerben DeJong, MedStar Health Research Institute & Georgetown U. School of Medicine, Washington DC
Dr Jean Hsieh, MedStar Health Research Institute, Washington DC
Professor Alistair Rothwell, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch.
Research Assistant: Caroline Norris, RN

Funders:

Canterbury Medical Research Foundation (CMRF)

Background

Little is known about how much and which type of rehabilitation is available in New Zealand for people with osteoarthritis (OA) prior to and after, joint replacement. In addition there is little information available regarding the effectiveness of rehabilitation for this group. While long-term outcomes following joint replacement are generally very good, up to a third may still experience pain and difficulties with activities of daily living following surgery. This study seeks to investigate how much and which type of rehabilitation people with OA access in New Zealand both before and after their joint replacement and whether rehabilitation improves outcomes in terms of better quality of life, reduced pain and increased levels of activity and function. In addition we specifically aim to examine whether there are differences in access to rehabilitation based on factors such as ethnicity or rurality. This information will help healthcare providers better meet the needs of patients both before and after surgery, ultimately contributing to improving outcomes for people with OA who elect to have a joint replacement.
Status:
Recruitment is in progress and due to be completed by mid-2016.

Outputs

Video

Following is a video of a presentation on the project 1

VIDEO: BAIL Peer Group 05/05/16 Dr Debbie Snell - "Thank goodness someone is keeping an eye on me." The importance of the therapy relationship in rehabilitation before and after hip and knee replacement.


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