After Participation

  • Will I get a copy of the results – how long will this take?
    You can ask to get a copy of the results of the study. In many cases, you will be asked to indicate on the consent form whether you would like to receive a copy of the results.
    • Often the results provided to participants are in a summarised form (rather than in an academic report). This is to allow you, as the participant, to understand the results easily. However if you would like a full copy of the results, then discuss this with the researcher.
    • Sometimes researchers will present the results of the study orally (i.e., at a workshop or research meeting). In some instances, participants may be able to attend these presentations. If this is something you would be interested in, discuss this with the researcher.
  • How will the results of the research be shared?
    There are usually a number of ways that results from studies are shared. They may include one, or a number, of the following:
    • A thesis (Masters or Ph.D.)
    • An academic paper published in a journal
    • An oral presentation at a conference
    • A poster presentation at a conference
    • An oral presentation at a research meeting or clinical workshop
    • A report written for clinical staff
    No material that could personally identify you should be used in any reports from the study. This includes your name, but also other identifying information such as a specific diagnosis, place of work or other such unique identifying features.
  • What happens to the information gathered in the study?
    The information that is provided during the study should remain strictly confidential. The researcher should be the only person that sees the information. If this is not the case, then any other person accessing your information should be named on the information sheet, unless you consent otherwise
    • No material that could personally identify you should be used in any reports from the study. This includes your name, but also other identifying information such as a specific diagnosis, place of work or other such unique identifying features.
    • The research information sheet should tell you where and how the information collected during the study will be stored both during the study, but also after it has finished.
  • Who benefits from the research?
  • People may choose to take part in research for a wide range of reasons:
    • You may want to share the knowledge you have gained since the onset of your injury or illness.
    • You may want to benefit from a new treatment or piece of equipment.
    • You may want to help other people with a similar condition in the future.

    What will I get out of it?
    • You may be able to try new treatments,
    • You might benefit from a new medication or treatment that is being trialled
    • You may find it helpful to talk to someone else about your experiences
    • You may enjoy being able to contribute to the development of future treatment

    How will it help others?
    • Not everyone who participates with benefit personally. Sometimes being part of a research study will benefit people who have challenges similar to you in the future. In fact, the treatment you have already received has been developed because people in the past have been willing to be involved in research to work out the best ways to treat people with your injury or illness.
    • Professionals who work with people with the injury or illness similar to yours will be able to use the results of the research to improve the way they treat people in the future