BAIL WORKSHOP

Presenter:

Dr William Levack
PhD MHealSc(Rehabilitation) BPhty
Associate Professor – Rehabilitation; Associate Dean – Research
Academic Head of the Rehabilitation Teaching & Research Unit
University of Otago (Wellington)

Held:

Date: Tuesday 16th July, 2019
Time: 10.30am –  11.30am
Location: Meeting Room 2.3a, Burwood Hospital

“Theory building in qualitative research”

Many interpretivist research methods begin with a stage of initial coding of data – the identification of concept, ideas, themes, and categories of information in qualitative data. This presentation focuses on what happens next: How you get from initial data coding to a substantive theory (i.e. the ‘results’ of your research). Although this presentation will have a primary focus on grounded theory methods, the techniques discussed will be relevant to other interpretivist methods such as phenomenology, ethnographic, and narrative methods. Suitable for Master and PhD students, people new to qualitative research, and anyone else interested in discussing theorisation in qualitative research.

Levack W 2019A/Prof. William Levack is the Associate Dean of Research for the Wellington campus of the University of Otago. He also works as an Associate Professor of Rehabilitation and Academic Head of the Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit in the University of Otago Wellington. Dr Levack is an Executive Committee member for Cochrane Rehabilitation – an international, interprofessional Field within the Cochrane Community – and was recently elected at the President of the New Zealand Rehabilitation Association. Dr. Levack has published over 60 peer-reviewed publications on rehabilitation, plus a number of textbook chapters. His research focuses on rehabilitation for people with neurological and chronic respiratory conditions as well as broader issues regarding interprofessional practice, person-centeredness and patient engagement in rehabilitation. He is currently leading an HRC-funded research project examining a new intervention to help people with COPD take charge of their health and wellbeing.