Current BAIL Scholars

Previous BAIL Scholars

Tracey Croot

Tracey Croot

Tracey  passed her Masters in December 2017 and graduated in August 2018.

Research Project:

A Masters of Health Sciences project through the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch.
“The implementation of a spinal cord impairment registry into clinical practice in the Burwood Spinal Unit, New Zealand.”

Supervisors:
  • Dr Jennifer Dunn, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Otago Christchurch.
  • Ms Julie Myers, Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington.
Duration:

March 2015 – December 2017.

Outline:

The benefits of patient registries are well established and wide ranging. Less is known of staff opinion and the impact of clinician data entry on staff. The aim of this Masters research was to explore the implementation of a SCI registry into clinical practice. The qualitative first phase used focus groups with clinical staff to explore opinions and experiences using a registry. The second phase explored and described quantitatively the patient population demographics. Statistical analysis focused on characteristics of the “missing data” (incomplete data entry).

Outputs:

Tracey presents at the BAIL Peer Group, 03 November 2016

Rachelle Martin

Rachelle  successfully defended her PhD in February 2018 and graduated in August 2018.

Research Project:

A PhD programme of study exploring what health and wellbeing outcomes are important to people who access rehabilitation services. Specifically, researching the outcomes that are important to riders within a therapeutic horse riding programme, along with how effectively New Zealand Riding for the Disabled (NZRDA) is achieving these outcomes.

Supervisors:
  • Fiona Graham, B. Occ Ther, PhD, Senior Lecturer in interprofessional rehabilitation at the Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit of the University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.
  • William Taylor, PhD, MBChB, FRACP, FAFRM, is Associate Professor at the University of Otago Wellington, Department of Medicine and consultant rheumatologist and rehabilitation physician at the Hutt Valley District Health Board.
  • William Levack, PT, PhD, MHealSc(Rehabilitation), BPhty is an Associate Professor of Rehabilitation at the University of Otago, New Zealand.
Duration:

September 2016 – February 2018.

Outline:

To develop a model for understanding mechanisms of change in health outcomes for riders with disabilities participating in therapeutic horse riding (THR).

Outputs:

Publications:
Peer-Reviewed Journals
Martin, R. A., Graham, F. P., Taylor, W. J., & Levack, W. M. M. (2017). Mechanisms of change for children participating in therapeutic horse riding: A grounded theory. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/01942638.2017.1400492
Conference Proceedings
Martin, R. A., Levack, W. M. M., Graham, F. P., Taylor, W. J., & Surgenor, L. J. (2017). Putting context in place: Therapeutic landscape experiences of child riders involved in a therapeutic horse riding intervention. Proceedings of the New Zealand Rehabilitation Conference: Making an Impact: Putting Knowledge to Work in Rehabilitation.

Rachelle’s blog: Reflecting Rehabilitation

Rachelle presents at the BAIL Peer Group, 03 November 2016

Jason Nicholls

Jason passed his Masters in 2015.

Research Project:

The Ready to Roll (RTR) study was undertaken to gain greater insights into the issues of emergency preparedness by a subgroup of people with disabilities in New Zealand, namely full time or part time wheelchair users. The aim of this research was to find out how ready for emergencies wheelchair users are and what they think about the concept of a Disabled Persons Emergency Response Register which could be used for planning and response to emergencies.  Read more about the project HERE

Supervisors:
  • Dr Jennifer Dunn,  University of Otago, Department of Orthopaedic Medicine and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch.
  • Dr Deborah Snell, BAIL.
Duration:

September 2016 – February 2018.

Outline:

The Ready to Roll (RTR) study used a nationwide survey of community dwelling wheelchair users to identify if there is widespread support for the concept of a register and to better understand what concerns people with disabilities may have with it. Current Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use amongst NZ wheelchair users were explored along with other potential ICT solutions, that could sit alongside a register, were considered.

Outputs:

Publications: Dunn, J. A., Nicholls, J. M., Snell, D. L., & Nunnerley, J. L. (2017). New Zealand wheelchair users’ preparedness for emergencies. Australasian Journal of Disaster & Trauma Studies, 21(1), 3-18. Retrieved from http://trauma.massey.ac.nz/index.html

Johnny Bourke

Johnny  successfully defended his PhD in February 2018 and graduated in August 2018.

Research Project:

A PhD project through the University of Canterbury titled “Disability and natural disasters: are those with mobility impairments remembered?” The aim of this research project was to explore barriers and facilitators relating to the areas of survival, preparedness, and coping during and following the Christchurch earthquake on February 22nd, 2011.  Read more about the project HERE.

Supervisors:
  • Professor Philip Schluter, University of Canterbury
  • Dr Jean Hay-Smith, University of Otago
  • Dr Deborah Snell, University of Otago
Duration:

July 2013 – July 2017.

Outline:

Research suggests that despite an inevitable degree of uncertainty, disabled people are disproportionally vulnerable during natural disasters. A variety of social, economic, and environmental reasons are believed to contribute to this, including damaged infrastructure which restricts mobility, inaccessible shelters and temporary housing options, requiring assistance to organise supplies and equipment, and dealing with emergency personal who had little knowledge of disability needs and how to address those needs. Research also suggests that disabled people are poorly represented in emergency planning, and that there is also little collaboration with disabled people in designing emergency planning which creates emergency organisations who struggle to understand the extent or specific nature of the issues that need to be addressed.

Outputs:

Publications:
Peer-Reviewed Journals
Bourke, J, Hay-Smith, E. J. C., Snell, D. L., & Schluter, P. J. (2017). Community inclusion of wheelchair users during the long-term recovery phase following the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.ijdrr.2017.05.004
Conference Proceedings
Bourke J, Schluter P, Hay-Smith J, Snell D. (2015). Wheelchair users’ experience of community inclusion following the Canterbury Earthquakes: a thematic analysis. Abstract accepted for oral presentation at the 2015 AFRM/NZRA Conference Wellington October 2015.

Johnny presents at the BAIL Peer Group, 03 November 2016